Wednesday, August 30, 2006

The Costandinos Beat

Though his name doesn't ring too many bells today, Egyptian-born composer/producer Alec R. Costandinos hit it big on the charts in '78 with his high-concept disco opus, Romeo & Juliet on Casablanca Records, performed with his "Syncophonic Orchestra." Along with masterminding a few semi-successful pop groups (Sphinx, Love & Kisses), he made a name for himself in the clubs in Paris, where he got a gig writing the epic disco score for Trocadéro Bleu Citron, a delirious skating musical revolving around a bunch of Parisian kids. It's all upbeat, catchy stuff, highlighted by the massive, 15+ minute "Trocadero Suite."

As if that wasn't enough to fill out a busy '78, at the end of the year he also released a very unusual concept album, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, a discofied adaptation of the Victor Hugo novel. Yep, it's a dark, gothic, romantic danceathon, and though it technically isn't a soundtrack, the approach is very cinematic throughout. Not surprisingly, the gypsy Esmeralda gets a sassy, Latin-flavored theme that's highly reminiscent of fellow disco-ers Santa Esmeralda (heard most famously in Kill Bill Vol. 1), but the rest is equally fascinating.

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5 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hey!
Thanks so much for this awesome blog!
I leave in Switzerland and discovered this site through research on the internet! I'm glad I found it!
The soundtrack for the Boogeyman creeps me out!

Keep it up!
Peace out-David

11:27 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

a million thanks for notre dame mate! :)) hmmm, what about witchcraft ost? thanks again & see ya! ....... g-designer

2:02 PM  
Anonymous Tim R-T-C said...

Wow, thanks for that 'Hunchback' album, it sounds fantastic - reminds me of ABBA a bit.

3:42 AM  
Blogger kenn said...

thanks man, I was looking for Quasimodo's Marriage, amazingly you posted this.

12:13 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hey whats going on, I was wondering if you could repost these links because they have expired; I am a new blogger. Thanks

2:55 PM  

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